Archive | July, 2014

What are these devices? Answer…

July 31, 2014

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Question earlier this week:  “There are two devices entering the mediastinal structures from below…what are they?”

IABP 2

iabp-2

There are a bunch of devices on this radiograph.  Here they are by color:

1.  Orange arrow:  A Swan-Ganz catheter coming up from the femoral vein

2.  Red arrow:  Intra-aortic balloon pump coming up from the femoral artery

3.  Green arrow:  External monitor cables extending to the various monitor points on the patient externally

4.  Blue arrow: Dialysis catheter coming from the right internal jugular vein

Admittedly, this is not your usual ED-based radiograph.  This patient was presented with a STEMI and in cardiogenic shock.  This was a radiograph obtained later in the cardiac ICU after coronary intervention.  The Swan-Ganz catheter is unclear if it is in proper position (pulmonary artery).  Usually Swan-Ganz catheters (AKA pulmonary artery catheters) are placed from the superior circulation and loop into the pulmonary artery.  This was placed under fluoroscopy while performing a coronary artery intervention in the cath lab; I’m not sure where the tip is located based on this radiograph.

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

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What are these devices?

July 28, 2014

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There are two devices entering the mediastinal structures from below…what are they?

IABP 2

 

Answer to follow!

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

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Not your ordinary arm fracture…

July 21, 2014

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This patient was shoveling, had sudden onset of forarm pain…

Radius fx 2 radius fx

This is a pathologic fracture from a forearm malignancy.  The patient’s primary malignancy was rectal adenocarcinoma.  This is a rare place for a metastasis.

The mechanism for this patient did not support a broken bone.  However one should keep in mind pathologic fractures when deciding whether to obtain plain films.  Plain films in the ED are quick, inexpensive, and don’t come with significant radiation risks.  I usually argue these points with my residents when discussion about plain film utilization in musculoskeletal pain.

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

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Liver mass…differential diagnosis

July 14, 2014

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This patient presented with right upper quadrant pain.  I asked last week what your differential diagnosis would be:

Liver Mass 1

Liver mass 2

The CT above shows a multiloculated, rim-enhancing mass in the liver parenchyma.  This is consistent with an abscess.  The differential diagnosis starts by breaking down the categories into bacterial, fungal, and amebic causes. 

Bacterial:  Abscesses can form from ascending cholangitis, especially in setting of biliary malignancies.   Klebsiella pneumoniae has been reported to cause hepatic abscesses, especially in E. Asia (1).  Patients with recent instrumentation (hepatocellular carcinoma embolization, etc) are at risk for MRSA, streptococcus species.  Tuberculosis has been known to cause hepatic abscesses as well.

Fungal:  Disseminated candidiasis in the immunocompromised host can lead to liver and splenic abscesses

Amebic:   Liver abscess is the most common manifestation of extraintestinal entamoeba histolytica (2).  In endemic areas or travelers to endemic areas are at risk for this occurrance. 

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

References

1.  Davis J, McDonald M.  Pyogenic Liver Abscesses.  www.uptodate.com

2.  Leder K, Weller P.  Extraintestinal Entamoeba Histolytica Amebiasis.  www.uptodate.com

 

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Liver mass…

July 7, 2014

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This patient presented with right upper quadrant pain…

Liver Mass 1

Liver mass 2

The CT above shows a multiloculated, rim-enhancing mass in the liver parenchyma.  What is your differential diagnosis?

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

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