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WWWTP #23 (What’s Wrong With This Picture?) Answer

March 12, 2015

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Patient presented with cough, fevers.  This Chest Xray was obtained:

WWWTP 21 1

One finding on this Xray is very concerning.  The Xray showed free air under the diaphragm.

A further diagnostic study was obtained (CT abdomen/pelvis):

WWWTP 21 2 WWWTP 21 3

Turns out this patient has pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis.  He has a history of this disorder and has had a prior laparoscopy showing multiple cystic structures in the intestinal walls.

Findings on imaging:

1.  Chest Xray:  Concern for free air underneath the diaphragm.  He also has a tracheostomy, pacemaker, scoliosis, and a right lower lung infiltrate.

2.  CT abdomen/pelvis:  The coronal imaging shows multiple cystic structures full of free air in the cecal area.  The cross-sectional imaging above shows a large amount of pneumoperitoneum.

Luckily this patient has a history of pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis.  He has had multiple abdominal CT’s showing similar findings.  Clinically he had no abdominal tenderness.  Keep this rare diagnosis in mind for the patient presenting with free air in the abdomen!  Information about pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3235639/

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

Image Contributor:  Mary Bing, MD

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Flank Pain…

February 10, 2015

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Flank pain for several days, history of nephrolithiasis:

Flank Pain 1 Flank Pain 2 Flank Pain 3 Flank Pain 4

This patient has marked right hydronephrosis with significant right renal perinephric inflammatory cystic changes extending into the contiguous right psoas musculature and right retroperitoneum. There is perinephric stranding and edema.

The differential in this case includes renal abscess (most likely) with extension into the right psoas and retroperitoneum.  Additional considerations are atypical infection such as tuberculosis, and urothelial malignancy.

The patient ended up having Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis.  This is a subacute/chronic pyelonephritis usually incited by a staghorn calculus.  For more information on this entity please see radiopaedia.org:

http://radiopaedia.org/articles/xanthogranulomatous-pyelonephritis

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

References

1.  Knipe H, Gaillard F et al.  Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis.  www.radeopaedia.org.  Accessed 1/2015.

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Rice bodies…

January 15, 2015

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Elderly gentleman came to the ED because he was wandering around the neighborhood.  A bystandard called 911.  He was pleasantly confused, had a mental status consistent with dementia.  The only other pertinent physical exam finding was some erythema, cellulitic appearance to his ankle.  We obtained a tibia and fibula xray looking for gas in the setting of cellulitis and this is what we found:


Rice bodies 2Rice bodies 1

 

The densities in the soft tissue of his legs are “Rice bodies.”  They are sometimes seen in systemic cysticercosis.  These bodies are calcified dead cysts from the organism Taenia Solium.  Typically this tapeworm is found in pork.  Taenia Solium is rare in the U.S., it is more prevalent in underdeveloped countries especially with a diet that has potential to include raw or undercooked pork.  This should also be on your differential with new onset seizures (1).

 

Multiple calcifications 1

 

He also had rice bodies on head CT.  Possibly the cause of his dementia?

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

References

(1) Parasites – Taeniasis.  http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/taeniasis/.  Accessed 1/2015.

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Student Corner: A Cavitary Lesion

January 6, 2015

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Cavitary lesions in the lungs are gas or fluid filled compartments in an area of pathology, such as a consolidation or a mass. Interestingly, a specific set of pathologies are known to cause this specific finding. Cavitary lesions can be detected on a chest x-ray, as is shown below.

cavitary-mass with IDCavitary masscavitary mass lateral with IDCavitary mass 2

Legend: Red Ellipse–cavity (with margins), Blue Ellipse–air-fluid level

The lesion practically jumps out of the picture on the AP view, but the colored circles are there just to point out the entire area of pathology (blue) and the cavity within (red). The pathology is a bit harder to see on lateral view, but the cavity has an air-fluid level that is easily identified as a vertical line separating a lighter fluid filled portion from an air filled portion. This air-fluid interface is often called a meniscus. You might remember being in chemistry class and measuring water out of tall beakers where the water stuck to the sides of the glass creating a concave meniscus. The surface tension of water allows it to stick to both itself and surrounding surfaces. If you look close enough, you’ll notice that the air-fluid level in the image above, best visualized in the AP view, has a slightly concave shape because the liquid at the bottom is sticking to the solid sides of the cavity.

The underlying pathophysiology is an interesting concept to understand when discussing cavitary lesions. A cavity can form in lung tissue for various reasons, but infection is the major underlying cause. Abscesses are localized collections of pathogens, fluid and immune system components that are walled off from the surrounding tissue, therefore creating a fluid-filled cavity. Tuberculosis is a disease process that involves caseous necrosis, which results in coagulation of cell proteins and liquefaction of cellular components. Eventually, the liquid portion drains out through the lymph system or through the bronchi, leaving air pockets behind. Necrotizing pneumonia and non-infectious processes such as ischemia and neoplasm can also cause a similar picture. Rheumatologic diseases such as granulomatosis with polyangitis and sarcoidosis also cause cavitary lesions by causing localized inflammation, which in turn leads to an area of increased mass, which then in turn can cavitate once the inflammatory reaction recruits fluid to the area. In other words, most of these processes, even if they aren’t inherently related to one another, all converge on the same mechanism of causing a localized area of inflammation.

With such a wide array of categories to choose from, it is perhaps more important than usual to contextualize the radiographic image with information about the patient.

This particular patient is a 30 year old male who presents with a cough.  He has been traveling around the world to multiple continents including Sub-Saharan Africa.  The extensive travel history, including to continents with rare infectious diseases leaves infection at the top of the differential. Things like Staphylococcal pneumonia, fungal infections and even amebiasis are possible because of the patient’s travel history. For a complete list of the infectious causes of a cavitary lesion, check the first two references at the bottom of the page.

References/resources:

Gadkowski LB, Stout JE. Cavitary Pulmonary Disease. Clinical Microbiology Reviews 2008;21(2):305-333. doi:10.1128/CMR.00060-07. (LINK)

Ryu, Jay H. et al. Cystic and Cavitary Lung Diseases: Focal and Diffuse. Mayo Clinic Proceedings , Volume 78 , Issue 6 , 744 – 752. (LINK)

Good pathologic image of caseous necrosis with resulting cavitation

Image Contributor:  James Luz, MD

Author:  Jaymin Patel

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What valve has been replaced?

December 16, 2014

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Here is a patient with a cardiac valve…he did not know which valve was replaced.  Which one is it?

Valve AP Valve Lat

RadDaily.com helps with this dilemma:

http://www.raddaily.com/whitepaperarticle.php?articleTitle=Cardiac+Valves:+Assessment+and+Identification

If we apply the rules from RadDaily.com to our patient, it appears he has an aortic valve:

Valve Lat EditedValve Lat

Valve AP editValve AP

AV = Aortic Valve*

TV = Tricuspid Valve*

MV = Mitral Valve*

PV = Pulmonic Valve*

*These are anticipated locations.  The locations could be altered if the patient has anatomic variations such as chamber enlargement, cardiac rotation, etc.

RadDaily also has additional information using flow directional clues from the shape of the valves.  Check it out!

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

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What valve has been replaced?

December 10, 2014

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Here is a patient with a prosthetic cardiac valve…he did not know which valve was replaced.  Which one is it?

Valve AP Valve Lat

Answer to follow.

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

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Massive splenomegaly…Answer

November 17, 2014

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Last week I showed you this CT showing massive splenomegaly:

Splenomegally + Masses

 

The abdominal CT above shows massive splenomegaly with various areas of hypo attenuation throughout the spleen.  Massive splenomegaly is a term used when the volume of the spleen is expected or calculated to be >1000 grams or clinically extends well into the left lower quadrant or past midline.

A short differential diagnosis for massive splenomegaly includes (1):

  • Malaria
  • Myelofibrosis
  • Leukemia (especially CML)
  • Polycythemia Vera
  • Lymphoma (several types)
  • Lieshmaniasis
  • Thalessemia

The ill-defined hypo attenuated lesions in this spleen raise a high concern for lymphoma.

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

References

1.  Luo EJ, Levitt L.  Massive Splenomegaly.  Hospital Physician, 5/2008.  Accessed 11/2014 at: http://www.turner-white.com/memberfile.php?PubCode=hp_may08_spelnomegaly.pdf

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Massive splenomegaly…

November 12, 2014

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This patient presented with left upper quadrant abdominal pain:

Splenomegally + Masses

 

The abdominal CT above shows massive splenomegaly with various areas of hypo attenuation throughout the spleen.

In the ED, the spleen is not often the organ responsible for non-traumatic pain in the left upper quadrant.  Gastric, colonic, and kidney disorders are much more predominant.  In this example however the spleen is definitively causing the patient’s discomfort.

What is your differential diagnosis for massive splenomegally?

Answer to follow

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

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Back pain…

October 7, 2014

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Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the ED.  The vast majority of patients do not have a life threatening or highly morbid pathology.  Unfortunately, this patient did:

 

CT LSpine 1 LS spine 2

This is a CT scan under bone windows.  It shows erosive changes based around the L4-L5 disc, eroding into the inferior endplate of L4 and the superior endplate of L5. These findings are concerning for discitis-osteomyelitis. It is favored to have both acute
and chronic components.

Finding this pathology is somewhat like finding a needle in a haystack.  However, pay attention to signs such as fever, repeat ED visits without a firm diagnosis, focal weakness, and predisposing factors such as IV drug abuse, history of endocarditis, or immunosuppression.  Sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are often elevated in this disorder (among others).

CT is a readily available, quick way to diagnose this pathology but it isn’t as sensitive as MRI.  Plain films are not reliable but may show changes similar to the CT above.  Nuclear medicine bone scans as well as PET scans can be used but are not commonplace in the ED.

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

Image Contributor:  Zachary Skaggs

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How to identify a cardiac rhythm device with CXR…

September 25, 2014

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How many times have you had trouble with figuring out what type of cardiac device (e.g. pacemaker/defibrillator) a patient has implanted?  A patient presented to our ED with chest pain, palpitations.  He did not have his device card with them, no prior visits to our ED, and did not know the manufacturer of the device.  How do you decide which company to call for interrogation?

Here is an article I found with radiologic characteristics of devices that can help identify which company produced the device.  It has a great identification algorithm they coined the CaRDIA-X algorithm:

http://www.ianchristoph.com/physician-resources-2/device_id.pdf

There are 5 major manufacturers currently:  Medtronic, Boston Scientific, St. Jude, Biotronik, and Sorin Group.  Each device manufactured by these companies have certain differentiating characteristics of can shape, battery shape, alphanumeric codes, capacitor shadows, coil types, etc.  Turns out you can identify the manufacturer using the device characteristics on chest X-ray relatively easily.

In the case I was describing above the patient had an easily identifiable Medtronic device and we were able to get it interrogated.  Our ED now has the algorithm posted at our doctor’s station so we can utilize it for device identification.

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

References

Jacob S et al.  Cardiac Rhythm Device Identification Algorithm Using X-Rays: CaRDIA-X.  Heart Rhythm 2011; 8(6): 915-922.

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